Introduction


Introduction

Introduction

Learn about the multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) framework and how it can be used to meet the academic, behavioral, and emotional needs of all students.

For more information or to participate in this training, visit the Certified TIER Trainers page to find your region's certified trainers.


introduction module icon
Overview of MTSS

Overview of MTSS

This is where it all begins—the foundation upon which all other pathways were built. We recommend this as the first training for MTSS newbies and experienced pros alike, so that everyone moves forward with a common understanding of the basic concepts and terminology found throughout all TIER pathways.

Highlights
  • The benefits of an MTSS framework
  • The relationship between MTSS and response to intervention (RTI), positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS), and other school programs
  • The MTSS model, including commonalities and distinctions among the different tiers
  • Key considerations for making your MTSS model a success


Roles and Responsibilities Within a Problem-Solving Team

Roles and Responsibilities Within a Problem-Solving Team

Campus problem-solving teams have one main goal: to meet student needs and improve the outcomes of all learners. In this pathway, you will take the first important steps toward that goal by learning how to put together strong, purposeful teams and run efficient and productive meetings.

Highlights
  • Who makes up a problem-solving team, including recruiting, defining roles, and adding specific expertise
  • What to cover, when to schedule, and what to do with data


Data-Based Individualization Within MTSS

Data-Based Individualization Within MTSS

Intensive intervention, or Tier 3, is considered the most challenging level of intervention for schools to achieve fidelity and appropriate intensity. Data-based individualization (DBI) offers schools a systematic, empirically tested approach for designing and individualizing instruction and has been shown to be an effective strategy for improving outcomes for students with severe learning needs. This pathway will walk you, step by step, through the DBI process.

Highlights
  • The basics of using line graphs to chart student data and interpreting that data with an easy-to-use decision-making rubric
  • Helpful tools, such as a daily intervention dosage log and an implementation checklist, to gain insight into the quality and fidelity of your intervention implementation


Student-Centered Approaches

Student-Centered Approaches

This pathway presents three important student-centered approaches to learning: explicit instruction, universal design for learning (UDL), and the interconnected systems framework (ISF). You will learn the basics of each approach and the different ways they support students.

Highlights
  • How explicit instruction can decrease cognitive load, thereby increasing engagement and achievement
  • How barriers and variability influence our ability to learn
  • How the brain’s affective, recognition, and strategic networks work together for learning to occur
  • How a focus on emotional health and well-being could affect our schools


Examples of MTSS Implementation

Examples of MTSS Implementation

In this pathway, you will explore what the MTSS framework and processes look like in three distinct Texas school districts at different stages of development.

Highlights
  • Demographic profile of each district
  • Descriptions of problem-solving teams at the district and campus levels
  • Essential principles that guide implementation of MTSS
  • Examples of helpful documents, such as a workflow chart, a year-at-a-glance document, and an intervention flowchart
  • Sample campus schedules that incorporate and prioritize MTSS


Supports for Special Education Referrals

Supports for Special Education Referrals

In this pathway, you will review how data collected through the MTSS process should be used by problem-solving teams to inform decisions regarding referrals for special education.

Topics
  • How progress-monitoring data can inform the referral process
  • How MTSS data can be used as a component of student evaluation, playing a particularly large role in the evaluation of specific learning disabilities (SLDs)
  • How MTSS data can inform individualized education program (IEP) development for eligible students
Critical Reminder

MTSS may not be used to delay or deny an evaluation of a child suspected of having a disability and needing special education and related services.


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